Viscoelasticity

How Conventional Adhesives Work

How Conventional Adhesives Work

All adhesives in widespread use today can be considered “wet” adhesives.  These materials are typically applied to a surface in a liquid state and achieve intimate contact by flowing along the surface and wetting surface asperities.  To be an effective adhesive, the liquid must be transformed into a solid with high cohesive strength through either a chemical reaction (crosslinking), or in the case of hot melts, by cooling below the melting temperature.

Robert Hooke - Artificial silk, cells, elasticity, astronomy, architecture, combustion, and more

Robert Hooke - Artificial silk, cells, elasticity, astronomy, architecture, combustion, and more

The concept of a synthetic fiber was first suggested by none other than Robert Hooke, another Englishman of notoriety from the 17th century.  Hooke built some of the earliest telescopes to observe the planets, and was among the first to flip the telescopes around and use them as microscopes to study plant and animal cells.  In fact, he was the one that coined the term “cell” to describe the basic unit of life.  His contribution to the story of electrospinning was in a passing reflection that if “very quick ways of drawing [a synthetic fiber] out into small wires for use could be found,” then artificial silk could be produced.