Conventional Adhesives

Conventional Adhesives

All adhesives in widespread use today can be considered “wet” adhesives.  These materials are typically applied to a surface in a liquid state and achieve intimate contact by flowing along the surface and wetting surface asperities.  To be an effective adhesive, the liquid must be transformed into a solid with high cohesive strength through either a chemical reaction (crosslinking), or in the case of hot melts, by cooling below the melting temperature.

Dry Adhesion Primer

Dry Adhesion Primer

AAI’s dry adhesive technology is based on the principle of contact splitting, which is a robust and reversible (elastic) mechanism of adhesion commonly exploited by animals such as flies, beetles, spiders, and the most prolific climber of all, the gecko.  All surfaces have some attractive force between them arising from weak, inter-molecular forces known as van der Waals (vdW) forces.  This force decreases linearly with the size of the contact, but the resulting stress (force divided by area), increases.  As a result, a surface made up on a large number of small contact sites will have an immensely larger interaction with a target surface than a smooth one.